REVIEW: “Rights Gone Wrong: How Law Corrupts the Struggle for Equality” by Richard Thompson Ford

Rights Gone Wrong: How Law Corrupts the Struggle for Equality, by Richard Thompson Ford Picador, 978-1250013927 Copyright October 2012, Paperback, 288 Pages This book is uncannily shrewd; it is in a league of its own with its plentiful offerings of unorthodox perspectives, profound arguments, piercing observations and refreshing legal reasoning. The prospective reader might need to perform mental…

REVIEW: “Game Love: Essays on Play and Affection” by Jessica Enevold, Esther MacCallum-Stewart

Game Love: Essays on Play and Affection, by Jessica Enevold, Esther MacCallum-Stewart McFarland, 978-0786496938 Copyright January 2015, Paperback, 284 Pages A mostly interesting and decent book exploring the theme of love in videogames. This book compiles a miscellany of material in varying styles and approaches in service to the subject matter of the book. The inclusion of moderate…

REVIEW: “Parables of the Posthuman: Digital Realities, Gaming, and the Player Experience” by Jonathan Boulter

Parables of the Posthuman: Digital Realities, Gaming, and the Player Experience, by Jonathan Boulter Wayne State University Press, 978-0814334881 Copyright December 2015, Paperback, 168 Pages Posthumanism and videogaming probed through the lens of philosophy and phenomenology. This episodically challenging read provides rather interesting and unique insights into the “machinic, posthuman” phenomenon and its play experience in digital play….

REVIEW: “Understanding Minecraft: Essays on Play, Community and Possibilities” by Nate Garrelts

Understanding Minecraft: Essays on Play, Community and Possibilities, by Nate Garrelts McFarland, 978-0786479740 Copyright September 2014, Paperback, 232 Pages A piercing intellectual discourse on Minecraft and its identity as a videogame. Beautifully written, this scholarly book provides a multifaceted analysis of Minecraft—its mechanics, aesthetics, features, value and applicability—and theorizes the game’s appeal, popularity, uniqueness and success. Organized in…

REVIEW: “How the University Works: Higher Education and the Low-Wage Nation” by Marc Bousquet

How the University Works: Higher Education and the Low-Wage Nation, by Marc Bousquet NYU Press, 978-0814799758 Copyright January 2008, Paperback, 281 Pages Dexterously written and strikingly thought provoking, this book examines deep-seated problems plaguing America’s academic labor system. Sprinkled with skepticism and cynicism, the author bluntly lay bare the paradoxes and ironies, abuses and superexploitations existing within the…

REVIEW: “Sociology of Education: A Critical Reader” by Ryan W. Coughlan, Alan R. Sadovnik

Sociology of Education: A Critical Reader, by Ryan W. Coughlan, Alan R. Sadovnik Routledge, 978-0415954976 Copyright March 2007, Paperback, 552 Pages The book contains an excellent sequential compilation of articles featuring critical sociological research and studies. The book’s strength lies in the assemblage of the great diversity of pundit voices and inputs, bestowing indeed an elite learning experience…

REVIEW: “Critical Readings: Media and Gender (Issues in Cultural and Media Studies)” by Cynthia Carter, Linda Steiner

Critical Readings: Media and Gender (Issues in Cultural and Media Studies), by Cynthia Carter, Linda Steiner Open University Press, 978-0335210978 Copyright December 2003, Paperback, 384 Pages This is a definitive piece of literature on media and gender studies. The text’s fascinating research and incredible educationality makes it an essential tool in the pedagogy arsenal; the in-depth investigations and…

REVIEW: “Fashion Cultures: Theories, Explorations and Analysis” by Stella Bruzzi, Pamela Church Gibson

Fashion Cultures: Theories, Explorations and Analysis, by Stella Bruzzi, Pamela Church Gibson Routledge, 978-0415206860 Copyright January 2001, Paperback, 416 Pages Fashion Cultures presents a profound, multifaceted, and critical examination of the cultural phenomenon of fashion. This book is an excellent anthology of articles penned by an eclectic range of experts from diverse disciplines. The text’s quality academic writing…

REVIEW: “The Political System of Brazil” by Dana de la Fontaine, Thomas Stehnken

The Political System of Brazil, by Dana de la Fontaine, Thomas Stehnken Springer, ISBN: 978-3642400223 Copyright October 2015, Hardcover, 419 Pages The Political System of Brazil is incontestably intellectually-stimulating. The book very methodically and logically examines the Brazilian political system in its historical, political and socio-economic contexts. Customary of titles published by Springer, this book is unsurprisingly excellently…

REVIEW: “Food Law and Regulation for Non-Lawyers: A US Perspective” (Food Science Text Series) by Marc Sanchez

Food Law and Regulation for Non-Lawyers: A US Perspective (Food Science Text Series), by Marc Sanchez Springer, ISBN: 978-3319124711 Copyright December 2014, Hardcover, 241 Pages Food Law and Regulation for Non-Lawyers is a phenomenal textbook introducing students to the fundamentals of U.S. food law, its associated legislations and local enforcement agencies. Its contents is aptly and functionally structured…

REVIEW: “Introduction to Law” by Jaap Hage, Bram Akkermans

Introduction to Law, by Jaap Hage, Bram Akkermans Springer, ISBN: 978-3319069098 Copyright August 2014, Hardcover, 344 Pages Introduction to Law is a content-rich, very meticulously-organized and practically-structured textbook optimized to present complex information in highly-segmented, concise and accessible morsels. The text qualifies as a compelling educational tool, as it satisfactorily delivers upon its proposition of introducing students to…